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Monday, 2 July 2018

July, gives a hand to June and August.

😏

2/July/2018
The kitchen garden is quietly producing...



The "White House" it is benign, not  like the real one!


Cabbages in the making.


Soon, Broccoli;


Borage for the busy bees.


Sellerie greens for soups and herb salt.


No garden without salvia, the bees love it.


Lemongrass; Neighbour's horse hangs over the fence to nibble on it.




Some of the Valencia oranges end up as Marmalade. Made in the Thermomix 5 is quick, easy and makes a very nice marmalade.

Next task, pruning and fertilizing the roses.

6/07/2018
Heavy rainfall over night. Nearly 60 mm

“The rain to the wind said,
You push and I'll pelt.'
They so smote the garden bed
That the flowers actually knelt,
And lay lodged--though not dead.
I know how the flowers felt.” 
― Robert Frost

 One row of potato bushes look a little harassed. I dug one plant out to have a look, this morning. I did not expect a crop. Alas here's for a few lunches or dinners.



..and a little stroll around the garden; a very mild day today. There might be more rain on the way. I am always to lazy to look at the weather patterns. My motto, if it it rains it rains, if it doesn't it doesn't, I can not do anything either way.😏 Just getting a bit dark now. glad did the wash earlier using the sun power on the roof.



Camellias are always a highlight in winter. They are so self sufficient, glorious flowers and tough as old boots.



I did not expect this Hibiscus to flower through the cool season.  I made a cutting many years ago and it flowers now the second time. I had no name for it, so I called it "Flamenco"





Bromeliad past flowering, still pretty with its red capsules, maybe seed.






Billi's and Lulu's resting place and many others never forgotten.


 
Brillantaisia has woken up.

The common name of Giant Salvia appears to be the most widely used common name is a misnomer as this is actually a member of the Acanthaceae family and the true Salvias are in the mint family or Lamiaceae. 

Bromeliads generally get fed from falling leaves and small twigs.

Hoya cumingiana lives in this tree since 20 years or longer, flowers 2-3 times a year. 
Bobbie enjoys to eat a few of the small leftover tomatoes.

That's it for today, folks, see you around

© my garden Photos and text Ts Lavender and Vanilla

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